Posts Tagged ‘Erik Martinez’

Excursions on Volume

New York City   Erik Martinez | Shawn Sims

Historically the process of standardization has spawned from the need for new structures of efficiency. The performance requirements of this process create unbiased arteries that are susceptible to forms of exploitation. This entails that at a global logistical scale, the network is blind with regard to the status of the goods; being licit or illicit. As globalization generates new organizational models for distribution, the intelligence of the counterfeit network is understood to be its ability to uncover and anticipate opportunities embedded within these structures of efficiency.

The modern shipping container is analogous with these standardized practices, both physical and protocological, and in an effort to increase globalization, this mechanism generates an opportunity for the insertion of a hack. Perhaps with an excursion into understanding the ability for weight and volume to be an operable energy, the container field of a port becomes an untapped resource able to generate new land.

Currently the dredged materials form the Hudson River are carried out into the ocean and dumped because of their toxic attributes. However the toxicity levels are dropping and for the first time since an industrialized New York, the sediment collected from dredging operations has the potential to remain in the city and be utilized in this land forming process.

The use of weight as a latent energy, and of dregde as a material are combined to reconsider the arrival of infrastructure to a once industrialized Hudson river. The fluctuating weight of container traffic is utilized to rigidify dregde to create a pixelated landscape which emerges from the existing water level. The commercial materials utilized within this infrastructure provide an emerging architecture with the products necessary to begin a series of retail and market spaces. A porous pixelated landscape rigidified by a membrane is stretched vertically to enclose space and change continuously as the market fluctuates in size.


Excursions on Volume _ Midterm Review

Should big box retail exist in New York City? The physical space required often prohibits such programs from existing in cities as dense as this, but perhaps the flow of goods and volume could be utilized to produce new land for these typologies to exist. If this were the case then no longer would big box retail cast the same political shadow it historically has. Instead it might offer a unique opportunity to channel the American consumer’s force into a land building operation. These images are from the Crisis Front Midterm Review and depict a range of studies that collectivity attempt to harness the power of global logistical flows and direct that energy into a tangible good that can be given back to the city. Currently the dredged materials form the Hudson River are carried out into the ocean and dumped because of their toxic attributes. However the toxicity levels are dropping and for the first time since an industrialized New York, the sediment collected from dredging operations has the potential to remain in the city and be utilized in a land forming process. With a system in perpetual growth and change like that of the shipping infrastructure and big box retail, coupled with a local material, a new dynamic between infrastructure and the consumer is on the horizon; one where you directly participate in the creation of new topographies.


Excursions on Volume_Review 1

Excursions on Volume Erik Martínez | Shawn Sims

Images from the first review of Spring 2010. These pertain to studies of volume fluctuation within port infrastructures for their harvesting and application as possible land growth and extension.

ss-em.com


Excursions on Volume_Final Review

Excursions on Volume Counterfeit Terrains   Erik Martínez | Shawn Sims

The life of a counterfeit product allows an opportunity to understand the clandestine activities through which it goes in order to successfully exploit a legitimate market. As illicit network, counterfeit economies rely on blind spots in the legislative, informational, bureaucratic and political aspects of legitimate networks. Through extremely precise protocols, such as extorting quantity and excess with regard to time, they are able to navigate and hack licit networks in a covert manner. These counterfeit networks have a specific knowledge regarding the protocological flow of the infrastructural arrangements; revealing through exploitation different ingress typologies. These moments of ingress exist simultaneously on different logistical scales allowing for multiple modes of infrastructural hacking to occur.

Historically the process of standardization has spawned from the need for efficiency. The performance requirements of standardization create unbiased arteries that are susceptible to forms of exploitation. This also entails that at the global logistical scale the network possess a duality regarding the status of the good: being licit or illicit. As globalization generates new organizational models for distribution and logistical networks, the intelligence of the counterfeit network is its ability to uncover and anticipate opportunities embedded within these structures of efficiency. However, the morphology of efficiency bifurcates to multiple logistical scales, each susceptible in its own way. Moments of ingress must be assessed with respect to the logistical and operational scale in which they are nested.

The modern shipping container is a natural offspring of these standardized practices, both physical and protocological, in an effort to increase globalization. While the mechanism of the container seeks efficiency it simultaneously generates an opportunity for the insertion of an illicit flow. The scale of this infrastructural network, coupled with a high volume of containers circulating around the world operates with a set of variables such as quantity, proximity, and time. Counterfeit movement can be understood as a form of slippage: the abuse of an unbiased network. Slippage can be quantified as a set of variable ratios that produce blind spots. In its most basic form, there may be simply too much volume and too little time to properly scan every container, thus slippage occurs and counterfeits seep into the market. While the relationship between time and quantity may exist on other network scales, the global infrastructures of transportation exemplify the power of this variable ratio. This ratio acts as a filtering mechanism that seeks to identify illicit traffic.

Certain logistical points along the trajectory of product movement are susceptible to highly intelligent protocological hacks. The global logistical infrastructure of shipping can be seen as a set of highly rigid channels providing passage to a steady flow of matter. The system is most comfortable when it exists in its normalized state of equilibrium. While this perpetuates the rigidity of the system, this is a highly fragile moment. At any instance there may be a point in the system that is experiencing great pressure, while, opposite that, there is a void created by this dynamic. The greatest threat to a system with this nature is flooding. Unlike a hack, which is a systematic attack on specific ingress typologies, flooding does not necessarily attempt to operate with stealth; instead it locates its ingress moment, and through sheer force, attempts to breach the rigid system. The flood is an attempt to disrupt the structure of the network and the equilibrium. This offers the illicit matter an opportunity to blend in with the masses. Both hacking and flooding occur due to specific counter-protocols in operation. The two modes are able to correspond at times and, at others, operate independently. In correspondence the power of the collective hack is able to generate a new, differentiated rigidity spawning internally out of the licit network.

Historically, logistical spaces were positioned within the closest proximity to urban areas. This was in attempt to maintain the singular space of commercial and social programs, often resulting in urban environments producing high degrees of capital flow. Within these spaces, a public forum, often times a plaza or park, begins to emerge as a viable topology for understanding the link between commercial and social infrastructures as they pertain to capacities of slippage.


Counterfeit City_Midterm Review

Counterfeit City Erik Martínez | Shawn Sims

The life of a counterfeit product allows an opportunity to understand the clandestine activities it goes through in order to successfully exploit a legitimate market. As an illicit network, counterfeit economies rely on blind spots in the legislative, informational, bureaucratic and political aspects of legitimate networks. Through extremely precise protocols, such as extorting quantity and excess with regard to time, they are able to navigate and hack licit networks in a covert manner. These counterfeit networks have a specific knowledge regarding the protocological flow of the infrastructural arrangements; revealing through exploitation, different ingress typologies. These moments of ingress exist simultaneously on different logistical scales allowing for multiple modes of infrastructural hacking to occur.

Historically the process of standardization has spawned from the need for new structures in efficiency. The performance requirements of standardization create unbiased arteries that are susceptible to forms of exploitation. This also entails that at the global logistical scale the network possess a duality regarding the status of the good; being licit or illicit. As globalization generates new organizational models for distribution and logistical networks, the intelligence of the counterfeit network is understood to be its ability to uncover and anticipate opportunities embedded within these structures of efficiency. However, the morphology of efficiency bifurcates to multiple logistical scales, each susceptible in its own way. Moments of ingress must be assessed with respect to the logistical and operational scale they are nested in.

The modern shipping container is analogous with standardized practices, both physical and protocological, in an effort to increase globalization. While this mechanism seeks efficiency it simultaneously generates an opportunity for the insertion of an illicit flow. The scale of this infrastructural network coupled with amount of containers circulating around the world operate with a set of variables such as quantity, proximity, and time. Counterfeit movement can be understood as a form of slippage; the abuse of an unbiased network. Slippage can be quantified as a set of variable ratios that produce blind spots. In its most basic form, there may be simply too much volume and too little time to properly scan every container, thus slippage occurs and counterfeits seep into the market. While the relationship between time and quantity may exist on other network scales, the global infrastructures of transportation exemplify the power of this variable ratio. This ratio acts as a filtering mechanism that seeks to identify illicit traffic.

There is a second more localized logistical setting that operates on the scale of a product or package. The staging of packages within a formal space offers a unique momentary stasis for understanding the data associated with any physical good. Within these spaces of logistics, embedded virtual data emerges as the primary organizational machine; providing the virtual with means to position physicality. Global trajectories, temporal agendas, and physical dimensions of products are translated into a virtual tags that have the ability to manifest a specific physical organization. A package’s location within a formal staging space is determined by its relationship with other packages in transit. Much like the unbiased arteries stemming from standardization, the data set attached to any one package positions the status of the material in such a manner that its legitimacy is camouflaged. In a sense, only the illicit product that is detected is actually illicit. The temporality of the counterfeit status is subject to termination without detection.

Certain logistical points along the trajectory of product movement are susceptible to highly intelligent protocological hacks, while others are nested with thresholds pertaining to sheer quantities. The global logistical infrastructure of shipping can be seen as a set of highly rigid channels providing passage to a steady flow of matter. The system is most comfortable when it exists in its normalized state of equilibrium. While this perpetuates the rigidity of the system, this is viewable as a highly fragile moment. At any instance there may be a point in the system that is experiencing great pressure, while opposite that, there is a void created by this dynamic. The greatest threat to a system with this nature is flooding. Unlike a hack; a systematic attack on specific ingress typologies, flooding does not necessarily attempt to operate with stealth, instead locates its ingress moment and through sheer force attempts to breach the rigid system. The flood is an attempt to disrupt the structure of the network and the equilibrium. This offers the illicit matter an opportunity to blend in with the masses. Both hacking and flooding occur due to specific counter-protocols in operation. The two modes are able to correspond at times and at others operate independently. In correspondence the power of the collective hack is able to generate a new, differentiated rigidity spawning internally out of the licit network.


Counterfeit City: Review 1

Counterfeit City Erik Martínez | Shawn Sims

The life of a counterfeit product allows an opportunity to understand the clandestine activities one goes through in order to successfully exploit a legitimate market. As an illicit network, counterfeit economies rely on blind spots in the legislative, informational, bureaucratic and political aspects of a legitimate network. Through extremely precise protocols, such as extorting time and excess with regard to security, they are able to navigate and hack licit networks in a covert manner. The counterfeit network has a specific knowledge regarding the protocological flow of the legitimate infrastructure; revealing through exploitation, different ingress typologies.

The indexical understanding of this data plays a key role in the definition of the network’s behavior. The project does not lie in this network explicitly, rather in a place guided by the characteristics of the research. This allows for its placement in a much broader spectrum of extremely specific protocols, succeeding the research as data, and entering it through its relational attributes. The protocols of control unveil a series of characteristics that provide a framework of relationships superseding the physicality of the network.

A counterfeit flow is highly adaptable and exploits various points along an infrastructural trajectory. As legitimate protocols and legislatures seek to unveil the counterfeit’s constituents, illicit discourse tends to maneuver away from contact points that pose a threat to its existence. In doing so, it tends to reveal a flexibility that is the nature of this illicit network. By extracting variables responsible for the dynamism of the illicit flow, a formula of elasticity may be reached. A simulation of a product’s life provides an incubation machine that is responsible for generating new typologies of this flow’s behavior. Within the simulation there are quantifiable elements that provide insight regarding degrees of exploitation and the infrastructural connections at fault.

Synthetic protocological migrations provide new typologies in illicit network behavior; supplying pedagogical tools in how one might hack logistical infrastructures. While the flow of a counterfeit product does not provide a transferable protocol, the nature of its protocological behavior provides a model for maneuvering through existing infrastructures. New York City provides infrastructural networks that pose an opportunity to generate an architecture that behaves with the intelligence extracted from the counterfeit’s hacking nature.

The city’s old subway lines are an example of an existing infrastructure that has ability to be exploited. One could imagine the skyscrapers of Manhattan penetrating the the ground even deeper, extending their foundations in order to hack the dead tunnels underneath the city. A new level of the city is resuscitated and the lines passing through the lowest level of Grand Central Station are now a thriving space. This relationship reflects the behavior of a counterfeit’s intelligence to covertly navigate away from formal logistical checkpoints. The active lines of New York however offer a rich context to insert the intelligence of the simulation. There may in fact be a way to hack this while maintaining the dynamism. One could imagine a program that is also mobile, but has nothing to do with transporting people or goods. This relationship exemplifies the nature of the counterfeit as it infiltrates the licit networks unnoticed and exploits the global flow.


Michael Chen and Jason Lee teach design studios and seminars at Pratt Institute. They both hold undergraduate degrees in architecture from the University of California at Berkeley and Master of Architecture degrees from Columbia University.

Michael Chen has taught design at Pratt Institute, Cornell University, Columbia University, and New Jersey Institute of Technology. He is a principal of Normal Projects, a multidisciplinary architecture and design firm based in New York and Los Angeles.

Jason Lee has taught design at Pratt Institute and Cooper Union. He is a partner at tentwenty, a multidisciplinary design firm based in New York.

COLLABORATORS
Gil Akos and Ronnie Parsons: studioMode and modeLab

STUDENTS

(2010-2011)
Gabriela Castro, Preston Church, Michael Dolatowski, Patrick Donbeck, Katherine Kania, Tai Li Lee, Younglee Lee, Carla Lores,Christopher McCormick, Vicky Perez, Arn Regencia, Hiram Rodriguez, Scott Segal, Insuk Shin, Michael Yarinsky. TA: Justin Snider

(2009-2010)
Ashkahn Bazl, Rebecca Caillouet, Zakiya Franklin, Sylvia Herrera, Mike House, Edwin Lam, Erik Martinez, Peechaya Mekasuvanroj, Victor Orriola, Roxanne Sadeghpour, Shawn Sims, Sean Stevenson

(2008-2009)
Jose Blanco, Joanna Cheung, Andres Correa, Ivan Delgado, Nick Garate, Allison Hoffman, Heidi Jandris, Kamilla Litvinov, Sebastian Misiurek, Jeos Oreamuno, Jun Pak, Anna Perelman, Cole Reynolds, Brad Rothenberg, John Seward, Jintana Tantinirundr. TA: Dorian Walther, TA: Elliot White

(2007-2008)
Katie Adee, James Baldauf, Leyla Dam, Asta Fivgas, Natasha Harper, Randall Hornung, Irene Huang, Jung Hyuck Im, Dimitris Kaprinis, Yohan Kim, Da Jung Lee, Danielle Meeks, Manny Padilla, Paul Stein, Stephanie Thomas, LeMarr Townsend